Jonathan Mooney was always the slow kid in class. Called 'stupid' and 'lazy' most of his life, he believed that because he was different, he was deficient. 
Britain's second most popular author, Jamie Oliver, has said his dyslexia can be an inspiration to kids who are struggling at school. 
 
In an interview with vlogger and CBBC star Nikki Lily, the world-famous chef said: "I did really badly at school with dyslexia, and to be honest I still struggle with it a bit today. I've had to learn little skills to get away with it. 
 
"I only read two narrative books and that was a struggle. But luckily I had cooking - and that saved me. " 
 
 
Hello, my name is Peter Harrower. I was diagnosed with a Learning Disability and Dyslexia at age six. It has been a long journey for me over the years. My disability really kept me down and under for most of my life. Before I get too far, I want to tell you first how blessed I am. I have an unbelievable family and my parents did everything they could to help me over the years battling this weakness of mine. I'm very lucky and grateful for everything they did for me. I'll be an honest school was like a prison for me. I HATED school with a passion when I was going through it over the years. My one and only goal from second grade when I was officially diagnosed even though the process started halfway through first grade. I still remember those days, crying in the morning before I went to school. Doing homework with my parents and studying for tests. 
I was blessed to be hit with a double troubble being both Dyslexic and ADD. God does love me :)) ( have corrected normal typo's but no spelling, grammor or things spelled right to not be caught by spell check and words out of context) went through tough times. 
As a dyslexic adult, wife of a dyslexic husband, mother of dyslexic daughter... 
My 19 year old son after failing AS level and 2 year BTec due to major disorganization problems -bad timekeeping - etc etc - I finally took him for a private Ed psych assessment 
It felt like the right time to put a name to her struggle, and her second-grade teacher thought it might be empowering. Another child in the class had recently laughed at Viv when she tried to read out loud, and we had noticed that she was beginning to get down on herself because she couldn’t read beyond the easiest of early reader books 
I used to be so mad at my dyslexia–so mad it controlled my life, so frustrated I wasn’t normal, so annoyed I couldn’t even order an ice cream without stammering. It took me awhile to figure this out, but my dyslexia isn’t a curse or a burden. 
Monique Crane specialises in helping people with neurodiverse differences, she is dyslexic, dypspraxic and autisitc so understand the challenges faced, for further information see her website www.mccas.co.uk. She kindly agreed to share a post she made to support a parent... 
In year 4 at primary I remember his teacher preaching to me. "Your son is not dyslexic, he is just naughty and lazy!" Oh how I would love to go and see her having now paid for a full assessment at the begining of year 10 to let her know the result: as SEVERLY dyslexic! 
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